Shellfish
Projects in Florida’s Franklin and Wakulla counties are vying for over $49 million in recovery funding from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. An application by the Panacea Oyster Co-op is looking to create a multi-purpose sustainable hatchery/nursery processing facility to benefit the industry in the Apalachee Bay, and to expand educational efforts.
A CBC investigation has found that Canadian grocery stores are selling imported shrimp containing antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
A glance at the US consumption data of shrimp indicates there are ample opportunities for investment in this sector. The US imported 1.5 billion lbs of shrimp in 2017, or over 90 percent of total domestic consumption.
The island community of Georgetown, Maine has been struggling since the fisheries they’ve depended on for a living have all but dried up. Pat Burns, a Georgetown resident of over 30 years knew something had to be done.
2018 was a busy year for the US farmed shellfish industry, filled with challenges, opportunities, and innovative ideas and techniques. American shellfish farmers have fought against regulatory hurdles and changing weather patterns while earning victories that will aid the industry in the future.
Saint John, New Brunswick-based aquaculture company Cooke Inc., has acquired Honduras-based shrimp farm business Seajoy Seafood Corporation in a private transaction between the two family-owned businesses.
If you’ve been to Eastern seaboard, you may have heard of Captain Clam. His name is Edward Stilwagen and hard clams have been part of his life since he was very young, in the 1940s, when they were worth only 2 cents apiece.
Shellfish growers in the United States are seeking to have an antiquated law amended to protect them from potentially crippling lawsuits.
A silicon-based non-toxic antifouling coating provides a promising effective protection against biofouling on shellfish farm structures, a study says.
Mussels are being wired with sensors on Canada’s East Coast to monitor water quality and potentially protect marine life including salmon.
The shellfish industry in British Columbia has at least two very happy people this fall. Carl Butterworth is the manager of the Vancouver Island University’s (VIU’s) Deep Bay Marine Field Station and Dr. Tim Green is the new Canada research chair in Shellfish Health and Genomics at the Deep Bay station.  
A nutrition researcher says human diet needs more shellfish because it has some of the most important essential nutrients humans need.

Professor Baukje de Roos, deputy director of the Rowett Institute at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland, discussed the major health benefits of seafood and highlighted the contribution of shellfish to a healthy diet at the conference of the Association of Scottish Shellfish Growers in Oban, Scotland.

Mussels, oysters, and king scallop roe contain Omega-3 levels between 1.1 and 2.4 grams per 100 grams of flesh, similar to oily fish such as mackerel, herring, and salmon, de Roos was reported as saying by Seafoodsource. Omega-3 fatty acids help to protect against stroke and lower the risk of mortality from coronary heart disease.

“Micronutrients such as selenium, iodine, and zinc are also found in abundance in shellfish and all have important functions,” de Roos said. “Oysters in particular are high in zinc and would be a good addition to the diet of anyone aware that they have a deficiency.”

Two trace elements commonly found in shellfish--cadmium and lead--were also found in increased levels in humans following increased consumption of mussels, but these were well below hazardous levels, even with three portions per week, said the report.
The future of oyster growers in Southwest Washington is in question after they were barred from using an insecticide deemed the only practical way of addressing a pest.

Dr Kim Patten, Washington State University Extension horticulturist, made the comment to Capital Press after the Washington Department of Ecology denied the Willapa Grays Harbor Oyster Growers Association the permit to spray 500 acres with the insecticide imidacloprid. Ecology says the pesticide is “too risky for Washington’s environment.”

“I don’t see anything else on the horizon that will work at the level growers consider useful,” Patten told the publication. “One of the real threats is the loss of family farms.”

Patten echoes the sentiments of Willapa Bay shellfish farmer Brian Sheldon. Sheldon earlier told Aquaculture North America that there’s nothing else that works against burrowing shrimp as well as imidacloprid. The pest destroys not the oysters themselves but their habitat.

“We’ve spent many years to find an alternative, everything from mechanical methods where you basically destroy the ground to get to the shrimp and we tried different culturing methods like off-bottom — that will buy you some time but eventually the shrimp density get so large that the structure to support that culture technique fails,” he said.
Maryland has increased public access to information on proposed shellfish tenures by posting pending commercial shellfish lease applications on the state government website.

The new set of online tools is aimed at helping educate and engage the public on proposed aquaculture lease applications. The tools include a dynamic database and email notification system managed by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

The tools were launched following consultation with aquaculturists, commercial watermen, community and county leaders, homeowners associations and others throughout the Chesapeake Bay. “During our state-wide listening sessions, we heard time and again that community leaders wanted to be alerted about proposed aquaculture projects earlier in the permitting process,” Fishing and Boating Services Director David Blazer said. “The new early notification system will provide near real-time data on all future aquaculture lease applications as well as information on location, status and type.”

Commercial shellfish aquaculture lease applications received since January 1, 2018, and determined to be complete, will appear on the database. “An application’s designation as ‘complete’ does not mean that it is approved. All proposed leases are subject to change throughout the permitting process,” the Department of Natural Resources said in a statement.
A tool that would detect norovirus in oysters prior to harvesting could be in the market by Spring of 2019.

Dr Jim Powell, CEO of the BC Centre for Aquatic Health Sciences in Campbell River, British Columbia, is developing the new tool.

Powell says growers often don't know if their oysters are contaminated until after the shellfish are harvested and packaged. He hopes the molecular detection tool will help prevent the spread of the illness and reduce the financial impact on growers if farms are closed due to norovirus, CBC News reported.

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